Luke fire fighter retrain life saving skills

Steven Kinkade, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron assistant fire chief for training, and Tech Sgt. James Hickman, 56th CES fire fighter, demonstrate how to use an automated external defibrillator Sept. 20, 2016, at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. Proper use of an AED is a core requirement for the CPR recertification class. (U.S. Air Force Photos by Airman 1st Class Pedro Mota)

Steven Kinkade, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron assistant fire chief for training, and Tech Sgt. James Hickman, 56th CES fire fighter, demonstrate how to use an automated external defibrillator Sept. 20, 2016, at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. Proper use of an AED is a core requirement for the CPR recertification class. (U.S. Air Force Photos by Airman 1st Class Pedro Mota)

Senior Airman Timothy Wallace, 56th Medical Operation Squadron aerospace medical technician, observes Airman 1st Class Geoffrey Moreland, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation with a pocket CPR mask Sept. 20, 2016 at Luke Air force Base, Ariz. The pocket CPR mask contains a one way valve to prevent the spread of disease. (U.S. Air Force Photos by Airman 1st Class Pedro Mota)

Senior Airman Timothy Wallace, 56th Medical Operation Squadron aerospace medical technician, observes Airman 1st Class Geoffrey Moreland, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation with a pocket CPR mask Sept. 20, 2016 at Luke Air force Base, Ariz. The pocket CPR mask contains a one way valve to prevent the spread of disease. (U.S. Air Force Photos by Airman 1st Class Pedro Mota)

Steven Kinkade, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron assistant fire chief for training, inserts a plastic lung into a rescue manikin Sept. 20, 2016 at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. Kinkade taught a four hour course to recertify Airmen on cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
(U.S. Air Force Photos by Airman 1st Class Pedro Mota)

Steven Kinkade, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron assistant fire chief for training, inserts a plastic lung into a rescue manikin Sept. 20, 2016 at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. Kinkade taught a four hour course to recertify Airmen on cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (U.S. Air Force Photos by Airman 1st Class Pedro Mota)

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE --

According to the American Heart Association, cardiovascular diseases claim more lives than all forms of cancer combined. Every 90 seconds someone dies from cardiac arrest. Early recognition and high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation is crucial to saving lives.

On Sept. 20, 2016, the Luke Air Force Base Fire Department's leadership team held a recertification class for life saving skills.

Steven Kinkade, 56th Civil Engineering Squadron assistant chief for training, volunteered to lead this four hour long training class while obtaining his recertification as a CPR instructor.

"Everyone in the fire department is required to complete the class every two years, but we do it annually," Kinkade said. "We do it annually to stay proficient because of the amount of medical calls we receive on and off base."

Before the class began, Kinkade set up a display of adult and infant CPR rescue mannequins for hands on training. Multiple automated external defibrillator machines were brought out along with videos which were presented.

“There are a total of 15 lessons not including remediation training,” said Airman 1st Class Geoffrey Moreland, 56th CES fire fighter. “Because we are held to a higher standard, if someone doesn’t score an 84% or higher on the final test that individual undergoes one on one training until they pass.”

Luke’s fire fighters can respond to an emergency call within five miles. They also have an automatic aid system with 26 partners for continuous coverage across the valley.  

“It is not a matter of if it happens, but when,” Kinkade said. “Because we can be called at any time for an emergency we have to stay proficient. At any moment a victim could have chest pains or a heart attack and we have to know exactly what we need to do. I call it organized chaos.”