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Airman volunteers, aids veterans amidst COVID-19

Senior Airman Montana McCormick, 56th Force Support Squadron lead recreational specialist, trims a tree April 1, 2020, in Avondale, Ariz.

Senior Airman Montana McCormick, 56th Force Support Squadron lead recreational specialist, trims a tree April 1, 2020, in Avondale, Ariz. McCormick regularly volunteers in the communities surrounding Luke Air Force Base. Luke employs more than 6,900 Active Duty, Reserve and civilian employees who dedicate their time to Luke’s mission while also supporting the community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Leala Marquez)

Airman 1st Class Bradley Chitwood, 56th Force Support Squadron food service journeyman (left), and Senior Airman Montana McCormick, 56th Force Support Squadron lead recreational specialist, trim a tree April 1, 2020, in Avondale, Ariz.

Airman 1st Class Bradley Chitwood, 56th Force Support Squadron food service journeyman (left), and Senior Airman Montana McCormick, 56th Force Support Squadron lead recreational specialist, trim a tree April 1, 2020, in Avondale, Ariz. Chitwood and McCormick regularly volunteers in the surrounding community. Luke employs more than 6,900 Active Duty, Reserve and civilian employees who dedicate their time to Luke’s mission while also supporting the community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Leala Marquez)

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. --

During the coronavirus pandemic, many people have found a desire to volunteer their talents to help others. 

Senior Airman Montana McCormick, 56th Force Support Squadron lead recreational specialist, began helping the community around Luke through the InstantHandz assistance app. He has volunteered his time to help people move, trim trees, do yard work and more. 

“About three months ago, I saw a sign that said ‘help your neighbor out’,” said McCormick. “I signed up and started doing these jobs here and there.”

McCormick explained the work brought him the rewarding feeling of helping those in need while also enabling him to meet local veterans.

“It’s like paying it forward,” said McCormick. “One day I want to retire from the Air Force, and I hope that once I get out I can find someone who’d help me if I need it.”

The veterans he has helped shared the sentiment and felt it was important for military members to take care of each other.

“We’ve got to give back to where we came from,” said James Carvar, retired Marine Corps aviation ordnance. “I went to boot camp in 1993 and now we’re in 2020. To me it’s just giving back to the ones that served before us.”

McCormick explained that the Coronavirus Disease 2019 has changed the way he’s operating including how he transfers money and communicates electronically, but has not changed his desire to help those in need.  

“It’s definitely rewarding,” said McCormick. “When you go to someone’s house, you help them out and the joy it brings them once you do the job. It makes you feel really good.”