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56th CES saves Air Force $1.2 million with in-house project

56th CES saves Air Force $1.2 million with in-house project

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Demitrius Benoit, left, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron structural craftsman, cuts concrete while U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Vincente Davis, 56th CES structural craftsman, observes, in the base fitness center, June 1, 2021, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. By executing the construction as an in-house troop-training project, the 56th CES will save the Air Force an estimated $1.2 million making it the largest active project of its kind in the Air Education and Training Command. In-house training projects enable the squadron to provide valuable training and real-world construction experience for Airmen while simultaneously completing infrastructure upgrades that will enable the 56th Fighter Wing to meet its warfighting needs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)

56th CES saves Air Force $1.2 million with in-house project

U.S. Air Force Senior Airmen Bradley Tucker, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron electrical systems journeyman, connects a wire to a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning component at the base fitness center, June 22, 2021, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. By executing the construction as an in-house troop-training project, the 56th CES will save the Air Force an estimated $1.2 million making it the largest active project of its kind in the Air Education and Training Command. The 56th CES provides technically sound combat engineers to build, sustain, and protect Luke AFB’s $2 billion in infrastructure and $4.8 billion of aircraft, through engineering. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)

56th CES saves Air Force $1.2 million with in-house project

U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 56th Civil Engineer Squadron, pull wiring through a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning component at the base fitness center, June 22, 2021, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. By executing the construction as an in-house troop-training project, the 56th CES will save the Air Force an estimated $1.2 million making it the largest active project of its kind in the Air Education and Training Command. The 56th CES provides technically sound combat engineers to build, sustain, and protect Luke AFB’s $2 billion in infrastructure and $4.8 billion of aircraft, through engineering. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)

56th CES saves Air Force $1.2 million with in-house project

A wheel loader assigned to the 56th Civil Engineer Squadron, pushes a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning chiller into the base fitness center, June 14, 2021, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. By executing the construction as an in-house troop-training project, the 56th CES will save the Air Force an estimated $1.2 million making it the largest active project of its kind in the Air Education and Training Command. The HVAC system upgrade coincides with the 56th Fighter Wing’s effort to bolster partnerships and infrastructure by providing units with sufficient resources, tools, equipment and facilities such as the fitness center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)

56th CES saves Air Force $1.2 million with in-house project

U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 56th Civil Engineer Squadron, level a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning chiller before moving it into the base fitness center, June 14, 2021, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. By executing the construction as an in-house troop-training project, the 56th CES will save the Air Force an estimated $1.2 million making it the largest active project of its kind in the Air Education and Training Command. The HVAC system upgrade coincides with the 56th Fighter Wing’s effort to bolster partnerships and infrastructure by providing units with sufficient resources, tools, equipment and facilities such as the fitness center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)

56th CES saves Air Force $1.2 million with in-house project

U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 56th Civil Engineer Squadron, prepare to move a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning chiller into the base fitness center, June 14, 2021, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. By executing the construction as an in-house troop-training project, the 56th CES will save the Air Force an estimated $1.2 million making it the largest active project of its kind in the Air Education and Training Command. In-house training projects enable the squadron to provide valuable training and real-world construction experience for Airmen while simultaneously completing infrastructure upgrades that will enable the 56th Fighter Wing to meet its warfighting needs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)

56th CES saves Air Force $1.2 million with in-house project

U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 56th Civil Engineer Squadron, guide a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning chiller toward the base fitness center, June 14, 2021, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. By executing the construction as an in-house troop-training project, the 56th CES will save the Air Force an estimated $1.2 million making it the largest active project of its kind in the Air Education and Training Command. In-house training projects enable the squadron to provide valuable training and real-world construction experience for Airmen while simultaneously completing infrastructure upgrades that will enable the 56th Fighter Wing to meet its warfighting needs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)

56th CES saves Air Force $1.2 million with in-house project

U.S. Air Force Airman Manolo Alvarado Hernandez, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron water and fuels system maintenance apprentice, tightens a cap on an underground water pipe at the base fitness center, June 2, 2021, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. By executing the construction as an in-house troop-training project, the 56th CES will save the Air Force an estimated $1.2 million making it the largest active project of its kind in the Air Education and Training Command. In-house training projects enable the squadron to provide valuable training and real-world construction experience for Airmen while simultaneously completing infrastructure upgrades that will enable the 56th Fighter Wing to meet its warfighting needs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)

56th CES saves Air Force $1.2 million with in-house project

U.S. Air Force Airman Manolo Alvarado Hernandez, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron water and fuels system maintenance apprentice, seals an underground water pipe at the base fitness center, June 2, 2021, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. By executing the construction as an in-house troop-training project, the 56th CES will save the Air Force an estimated $1.2 million making it the largest active project of its kind in the Air Education and Training Command. In-house training projects enable the squadron to provide valuable training and real-world construction experience for Airmen while simultaneously completing infrastructure upgrades that will enable the 56th Fighter Wing to meet its warfighting needs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)

56th CES saves Air Force $1.2 million with in-house project
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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Demitrius Benoit, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron structural craftsman, cuts concrete in preparation for a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system upgrade at the base fitness center, June 1, 2021, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. By executing the construction as an in-house troop-training project, the 56th CES will save the Air Force an estimated $1.2 million making it the largest active project of its kind in the Air Education and Training Command. In-house training projects enable the squadron to provide valuable training and real-world construction experience for Airmen while simultaneously completing infrastructure upgrades that will enable the 56th Fighter Wing to meet its warfighting needs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)

56th CES saves Air Force $1.2 million with in-house project
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U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 56th Civil Engineer Squadron, discuss the proper procedure to install wiring into a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning component at the base fitness center, June 22, 2021, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. By executing the construction as an in-house troop-training project, the 56th CES will save the Air Force an estimated $1.2 million making it the largest active project of its kind in the Air Education and Training Command. The 56th CES provides technically sound combat engineers to build, sustain, and protect Luke AFB’s $2 billion in infrastructure and $4.8 billion of aircraft, through engineering. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. -- U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Demitrius Benoit, left, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron structural craftsman, cuts concrete while U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Vincente Davis, 56th CES structural craftsman, observes, in the base fitness center, June 1, 2021, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. By executing the construction as an in-house troop-training project, the 56th CES will save the Air Force an estimated $1.2 million making it the largest active project of its kind in the Air Education and Training Command. In-house training projects enable the squadron to provide valuable training and real-world construction experience for Airmen while simultaneously completing infrastructure upgrades that will enable the 56th Fighter Wing to meet its warfighting needs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)